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CB650F Steering Aligment

wexbike

2018
CB650F
Messages
23
Likes
8
Thread starter #1
I'm working on setting up the steering on a 2018 CB650f. The bar was visibly out of alignment.I followed the Utube video by "Delboy" which shows clearly how to complete the job. I slacked off the front steering bolt and all the bolts as he outlined , pumped up/down the forks etc. etc then when satified the steering was straight I torqued the bolts . I checked the rear wheel aligment and used a length of string to check the overall alignment from the front to the rear. The steering looks straight but when I take a measurement on both sides of the bike from the spigot under the saddle to the centre of the bar ends I get a 10mm difference. The bike has never been dropped so the handlebars can't be bent. I have completed the whole alignment procedure a couple of times with the same result. Any answer to my problem would really be great I can't figure it out.
 

Devilsfan

2018
CB650F
Messages
107
Likes
66
Location
Tampa, Florida
#2
If you have a picture that'd be great!

Are you sure it's not the actual bars that are not aligned? Maybe loosen the bar risers then check the bars. There should be two grooved areas going around the bars to center on the risers.

Also, when you ride is the bike pulling to one side?
 

wexbike

2018
CB650F
Messages
23
Likes
8
Thread starter #3
Thank for that I have removed the four bolts clamping the bars and made sure the splines look central from side to side do you mean the bolts down under the lower handle bar bracket. I don’t think the pic would show the problem it’s the measurement to the bar ends is off by the 10 mm. Thanks for your reply.. Wexbike
 

Devilsfan

2018
CB650F
Messages
107
Likes
66
Location
Tampa, Florida
#4
Thank for that I have removed the four bolts clamping the bars and made sure the splines look central from side to side do you mean the bolts down under the lower handle bar bracket. I don’t think the pic would show the problem it’s the measurement to the bar ends is off by the 10 mm. Thanks for your reply.. Wexbike

What is the "spigot under the saddle" you're referencing? And I'll try to find the video you're talking about.
 

miweber929

2014
CBR650F
Mod
650F Alumnus
Messages
1,629
Likes
927
Location
Woodbury, MN
#5
Here’s what I do when this happens:

Go back to your old BMX days and when I’d crash and tweak the stem/handlebar position, I’d squeeze the front wheel between my legs, grab the handlebars and twist until it’s all in alignment. Sometimes it’s the rubber damping plugs the handlebar is mounted to, sometimes it’s other things but if I can’t get it straight the conventional way. And that’s what I try if it was my bike.

In fact, just did it with the WR250R I just bought that was tipped over and tweaked the steering a bit.

I’ve also VERY carefully banged the tire on a pole/tree/house to get it to budge straight. Be VERY careful not to bang the rim but a gentle yet firm whack can bring it back.
 

Devilsfan

2018
CB650F
Messages
107
Likes
66
Location
Tampa, Florida
#7
Ahh...that's the luggage bolt! (# 8 in the scematic)



You could always try what Mike said!

BTW...are your forks aligned with the triple tree? Are both end caps flush? I know any time you loosen the fork clamps you can accidentally misalign them.
 
Last edited:

wexbike

2018
CB650F
Messages
23
Likes
8
Thread starter #8
Here’s what I do when this happens:

Go back to your old BMX days and when I’d crash and tweak the stem/handlebar position, I’d squeeze the front wheel between my legs, grab the handlebars and twist until it’s all in alignment. Sometimes it’s the rubber damping plugs the handlebar is mounted to, sometimes it’s other things but if I can’t get it straight the conventional way. And that’s what I try if it was my bike.

In fact, just did it with the WR250R I just bought that was tipped over and tweaked the steering a bit.

I’ve also VERY carefully banged the tire on a pole/tree/house to get it to budge straight. Be VERY careful not to bang the rim but a gentle yet firm whack can bring it back.
Thanks for the reply please find in the picture what I’m talking about


You could always try what Mike said!

BTW...are your forks aligned with the triple tree? Are both end caps flush? I know any time you loosen the fork clamps you can accidentally misalign them.[/QUOTE]

The uTube video I used was at I didn't release the top clamp so the forks would not slipped up or down. But the 10mm difference is what is puzzling me.
The wheels are in line and the steering visually look straight maybe I'm being too fussy but you know when you love your bike.
 

Devilsfan

2018
CB650F
Messages
107
Likes
66
Location
Tampa, Florida
#9
I watched the video below:



You may want to repeat your process and make sure you tighten everything from the top down. Listen to what he says at the 11:30 mark. Back and forth, don't tighten one bolt all the way. Do them a little one at a time.
 

Devilsfan

2018
CB650F
Messages
107
Likes
66
Location
Tampa, Florida
#10
I didn't release the top clamp so the forks would not slipped up or down. But the 10mm difference is what is puzzling me.
The wheels are in line and the steering visually look straight maybe I'm being too fussy but you know when you love your bike.

I get what you're saying and know that if you don't get it "just right" it's going to be bugging you!!!

Reminds me of adjusting the chain slack...as soon as you tighten up the axle bolt the chain get's tighter than what you measured! Sure, you could still ride it but it's going to bug you until you unloosen, readjust, and get it correct!
 

wexbike

2018
CB650F
Messages
23
Likes
8
Thread starter #11
I get what you're saying and know that if you don't get it "just right" it's going to be bugging you!!!

Reminds me of adjusting the chain slack...as soon as you tighten up the axle bolt the chain get's tighter than what you measured! Sure, you could still ride it but it's going to bug you until you unloosen, readjust, and get it correct!
Exactly what you're saying. someone else would'nt even notice it.
 

miweber929

2014
CBR650F
Mod
650F Alumnus
Messages
1,629
Likes
927
Location
Woodbury, MN
#12
The wheels are in line and the steering visually look straight maybe I'm being too fussy but you know when you love your bike.
The amount of factors that could go into a 10mm difference from the back of the bike on a bolt under the seat to the handlebar weights could be hundreds.

If the wheel looks straight, the bars feel straight and the bike tracks straight, stop measuring, leave it be and enjoy the thing.

The situation reminds me of this beautiful '62 Reissue American made Fender Strat I bought years ago for a huge sum (at the time) that was the best guitar I had bought up to that point in my short life but I couldn't keep it in tune. Actually, it was the "G" string that "slightly" hung up and Drove. Me. Damn. Crazy. I took it to the shop I bought it from and had it setup probably 5 different times, each time it came back and to me it still slightly hung up. Finally the last time the luthier asked if I was playing the guitar with a tuner plugged in and turned on and yep, I was. He suggested I unplug it when I play and see if it still hung up.

It didn't.

What I learned from that was this: sometimes what you don't know can't bother you.

:)
 

wexbike

2018
CB650F
Messages
23
Likes
8
Thread starter #13
The amount of factors that could go into a 10mm difference from the back of the bike on a bolt under the seat to the handlebar weights could be hundreds.

If the wheel looks straight, the bars feel straight and the bike tracks straight, stop measuring, leave it be and enjoy the thing.

The situation reminds me of this beautiful '62 Reissue American made Fender Strat I bought years ago for a huge sum (at the time) that was the best guitar I had bought up to that point in my short life but I couldn't keep it in tune. Actually, it was the "G" string that "slightly" hung up and Drove. Me. Damn. Crazy. I took it to the shop I bought it from and had it setup probably 5 different times, each time it came back and to me it still slightly hung up. Finally the last time the luthier asked if I was playing the guitar with a tuner plugged in and turned on and yep, I was. He suggested I unplug it when I play and see if it still hung up.

It didn't.

What I learned from that was this: sometimes what you don't know can't bother you.

:)
I know in heart your're right. It's a bit like when I got the bike new I parked up and when I came back there was a dent in the tank. Someone had got on the bike and while getting on or off put the dent in it. I managed to pull most of the dent out fairly well but every so often when I'm leaving the bike in the garage that little tiny tiny dent looks up at me. I'm slowly coming to terms with it. :)
 

wexbike

2018
CB650F
Messages
23
Likes
8
Thread starter #14
One other question if I may. In the uTube video above the Guy does not setup the front calipers and tighten the pinch bolts and front axle bolts as in the video explained by Dave Moss. I think the Dave Moss way of setting up the front end is probably better. Just wondering what do you think.

 

Devilsfan

2018
CB650F
Messages
107
Likes
66
Location
Tampa, Florida
#15
Not saying his method is wrong (and not saying my method is right!)...but when putting the tire back on the motorcycle I've always bolted the axle nut FIRST and tighten to nearly torque spec, then tightened the bottom pinch fork bolts. He mentions he tightens the pinch fork bolts first because he wants to get the correct torque??? You're going to fight with the axle bolt if you do that!

Also, I do NOT let the brake calipers hang down like he does! Too easy to hit it and scratch something. I normally pull a covered block next to the bike and carefully set the calipers on it.

That's my way!
 

wexbike

2018
CB650F
Messages
23
Likes
8
Thread starter #16
Not saying his method is wrong (and not saying my method is right!)...but when putting the tire back on the motorcycle I've always bolted the axle nut FIRST and tighten to nearly torque spec, then tightened the bottom pinch fork bolts. He mentions he tightens the pinch fork bolts first because he wants to get the correct torque??? You're going to fight with the axle bolt if you do that!

Also, I do NOT let the brake calipers hang down like he does! Too easy to hit it and scratch something. I normally pull a covered block next to the bike and carefully set the calipers on it.

That's my way!
Great help thank you for that