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Both Smoother Throttle

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Thread starter #1
When trying to ride slow and smooth why is it so hard to go from zero throttle to just barely on the gas without a jerk? Its like the throttle is an on off switch and is difficult to operate smoothly on the low side. I put a throttle tamer on it and its better but still leaves a lot to be desired. This is not a big deal and every bike I've ridden is like that and know these bikes are not made to ride "slow" but there are a lot of times when you have to ride slow.

Just wanted to get some thoughts on this and would putting a pipe and Power Commander on with a proper tune smooth this out?
 

Avoki

2018
CB ABS
Messages
27
Likes
32
Location
Arlington, VA, USA
#3
When trying to ride slow and smooth why is it so hard to go from zero throttle to just barely on the gas without a jerk? Its like the throttle is an on off switch and is difficult to operate smoothly on the low side. I put a throttle tamer on it and its better but still leaves a lot to be desired. This is not a big deal and every bike I've ridden is like that and know these bikes are not made to ride "slow" but there are a lot of times when you have to ride slow.

Just wanted to get some thoughts on this and would putting a pipe and Power Commander on with a proper tune smooth this out?
BTW, I have a 2018 CB 650F
I know the feeling so well, the only solution I found other than dishing out for the throttle tamer was to ride 1 gear up.
 
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12
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12
Location
Northern New Jersey
#7
If I'm trying to go very slowly (like almost idling in 1st) , especially in a tight turn, I usually keep a light foot on the rear brake. I find it provides enough resistance to smooth out the blips in the throttle.

With that technique, I am comfortable feet up even at full turn on my handlebars. YMMV.
 

bishop

2014
CBR
Messages
124
Likes
75
#8
I have a G2 Street Tamer Throttle Tube, it helps a little, not mind blowing.

I also have a Two bros full exhaust and a power commander. I have the jerk issue, mostly when going really slow in traffic or slow city speed riding.

Previous owner removed the silencer in the exhaust, I ordered and installed the part to make less noise, and it made the throttle less jerky. If your silencer is removed, put it back in to see if it helps.

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I read the problem also happens in other big bikes like the CBR600RR and 1000RR, keeping the revs up is suppose to help, maybe -1 tooth front sprocket might help?
tamer1.jpg
 
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miweber929

2014
CBR
Mod
650F Alumnus
Messages
1,175
Likes
578
Location
Woodbury, MN
#9
Throttle adjustment is the first key and a PCV may help a bit but will not be a night and day difference. I run almost no throttle free play in my FI motorcycle throttles. In the end it’s partially the nature of a fuel injected system where fuel is either on or off so when you are transitioning back and forth between fuel and no fuel, like in a slow speed maneuvering situation, you’ll always have sone jerkiness.

As others have stated, keeping the throttle on is a way to keep that transition from happening so using the brakes to regulate your speed can be a band-aid helper.

When you’re saying low speed, what specifically are you doing?
 

Road Hog

2014
CBR ABS
Messages
602
Likes
471
Location
Thailand
#10
I don't understand this as i ride in slow traffic often. Right now there is a lot a road work
in my city and i have to ride real slow.I just use my clutch and throttle not just throttle to get me past the real
slow places. I think most bikes would be the same unless you had Dct.
 
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491
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460
Location
Ventura, CA
#11
Per some of the comments above, specifically R Road Hog & miweber929 miweber929 , they are helpful. I dealt with this the first year I had the bike and realized it was much more me and much less the bike, specifically riding style. On the FI bikes, release of the throttle turns off the injectors and the driveline unloads (the chain and sprockets). When you get back on the throttle that jerk you are experiencing is most likely the driveline loading back up as you are asking it to do work. I adjusted my riding style and use the clutch more and 95% of it goes away. Think of low-speed maneuvering and how you would modulate the clutch. HTH.
 

Jerry

2016
CBR ABS
Messages
559
Likes
491
Location
The Netherlands
#12
Let me add this: what I learned is that in low speed situations, you don't control speed with the throttle. What you do is:

1 - Give a small amount of throttle so that there's tension on the drivetrain parts of the bike. Jerkiness doesn't happen only from on/off throttle but also because when you're off the throttle, your chain gets slack and as soon as you get back on the throttle the first thing your chain does is get tensioned back up which caused a jerk as well.
2 - Pull in your clutch lever so far that you just hit that biting point. You want the clutch to slip a tiny bit so low RPM won't cause the bike to stall. It's not a huge problem on the 650F but will be on other bikes.
3 - Most importantly, use the rear brake to control speed. Keep a bit of pressure on the rear brake while riding slowly and increase/decrease pressure to slow down or speed up respectively.

This is pretty much what you have to learn here in the Netherlands before you can get your motorcycle license. Riding slowly (6 to 8 kmh, about 4mph) is actually part of one of the exams you have to take.

What you could do is find an empty parking lot to practice this. Put the bike in 1st gear, open up the throttle a bit and slip the clutch a bit. When doing this you'll find yourself quickly going over 10kmh but that's where the rear brake comes in. Don't change the amount of pressure on your clutch and throttle, only change the rear brake. Riding slowly isn't hard once you know this technique.
 
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4
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1
Thread starter #14
Guys, thanks for all the responses, the solution to my problem was simple. When I put the Throttle Tamer on I forgot to glue my grips and it slide up close to the housing next to it causing it to stick pretty bad. I feel pretty stupid because I'm a pretty good mechanic and overlooked a simple thing but thought I would post this for others if they are experiencing this. I ended up moving the grip over and spraying some lube on the parts that slide and its way way better now.
 
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7
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10
Location
Canada
#15
In my case free play was the culprit.. the dealer had set free play to 6mm (which I think is the maximum specified in the manual).

Bringing it down to 2-3mm made a massive improvement to how smooth I'm able to execute low-speed maneuvers.

That said, this bike definitely feels 'jerkier' than my last (VFR800). It's 100% stock.
 
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14
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4
#16
hi there I found the throttle jerky at the beginning. I had a DL650 before and it seemed alot smoother. What I find helps with throttle control is to steady your throttle opening by resting a couple of fingers on the brake lever it also helps in particular going over speed ramps. I'd say for definite nothing wrong with the bike'
 
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