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CB650F Hello!

Messages
9
Likes
3
Thread starter #1
I'm Mack from Blythewood, SC. I ride a 2015 CB650F. Well, I actually just bought it from a friend and I usually just drive a car so...I really need help with how to handle the bike itself and the lifestyle changes that it brings with it.

Thanks!
 

Jerry

2016
CBR650F ABS
Messages
903
Likes
758
Location
The Netherlands
#2
I'm European so the idea of buying a bike without proper licensing is a completely odd idea to me. However, I bet I wouldn't be the only one to strongly suggest taking a MSF course to learn the basics of riding a motorcycle.

Also, get proper gear. Don't cheap out on a helmet, gloves, boots and a suit. The latter doesn't need to be a full on leather race suit (expensive!) but textile riding pants and jacket with armored knees, back and elbows on is a minimal must IMO.

Find an empty parking lot and get used to the weight of the bike, how it reacts to various inputs and do some slow speed maneuvers. Once you feel comfortable, do some emergency brakes at 30mph.

When in traffic, anticipate things ahead at least twice as far ahead as you would with a car. Move yourself out of icky situations. Not just the ones that are immediately dangerous, but also the ones that can potentially turn into a dangerous situation. I view things a bit like chess sometimes. "While riding at a certain spot things might be fine, but if that one car moves to the right, there's no way for me to make room for that merging truck, so I better speed up or slow down to make room for both first".

As in lifestyle changes... Well, stay healthy and remember, from now on forward, you'll be continually looking for excuses to ride. Your commute to work will probably take twice as long as well ;)
 

Devilsfan

2018
CB650F
Messages
107
Likes
66
Location
Tampa, Florida
#3
Hello Mack!

+1 on what Jerry says...TAKE THE MSF COURSE!!! You'll learn a ton that can, literally, save your life! It's actually a good time as the trainers are there to TEACH YOU, not fail you!

As for "lifestyle", coming from cruisers most of my riding life, the "Lifestyle" is BS. Wear the gear that's comfortable for you and ride because you enjoy it, NOT because it's a fashion show!

Enjoy your Honda, ride safely and embrace the motorcycle therapy!
 

miweber929

2014
CBR650F
Mod
650F Alumnus
Messages
1,629
Likes
927
Location
Woodbury, MN
#4
I'm Mack from Blythewood, SC. I ride a 2015 CB650F. Well, I actually just bought it from a friend and I usually just drive a car so...I really need help with how to handle the bike itself and the lifestyle changes that it brings with it.

Thanks!
Welcome!!! Great advice from the guys above.

First thing, go to the MSF course. Contrary to what others think and say you do not need to know anything about motorcycles or how to ride to begin, in fact it’s better you don’t. I trained to be an MSF instructor 20 years ago and we liked fresh riders the best because they had to bad habits to break.

Second, get yourself a helmet and clothing that fits. Find a multi line helmet store and try everything on regardless of brand, price and style and figure out what fits you and feels the best. From there you can bring the price down to an acceptable level. As far as clothing, get a decent, mesh or textile jacket, one that has several zip in and out liners and layers so you’re covered for all types of weather. Don’t go super expensive, you still don’t know what you like. Same with gloves. Get a comfortable pair of over the ankle boots or motorcycle specific shoes, they’ll help you feel more stable on the bike. As time and money allows, buy a pair of motorcycle specific jeans but for now a good pair of actual denim jeans, not the cheap Old Navy stretch jeans, will suffice.

If you can find a local Cycle Gear they’ll have all of it or start looking used on Craigslist, Facebook marketplace or a local motorcycle forum.

Don’t spend a ton on stuff yet, that’s a newbie mistake. Until you’ve ridden a bit and have some time under your belt you don’t know what feels right, bad, uncomfortable or conversely what works for you and your comfort. When you start playing guitar you don’t go out and buy a Custom Shop Stratocaster, you buy a learner; same thing here. You’ll replace things as you go with what you like.

The most important thing to do is wear all your gear, all the time (ATGATT). If you get a mesh jacket it won’t be that hot even in a SC summer. And if the people you are riding with say otherwise, they are not the group to ride with because anyone that cares about you would want you safe first.

As stated, the “lifestyle” thing is BS. If that’s what you’re looking for then you’re potentially getting involved in a crowd that will spell disaster and can hurt you. Bad. Ride how you want to ride, be into it as much as you want to be in it but it doesn’t have to be anything more than that. Just know that eventually most of your extra money will go to parts, T-shirt’s, Gear, helmets, tires, etc. And that’s a good thing.

Lots of good experience on the board, we’re here to help.
 
Messages
9
Likes
3
Thread starter #5
I'm European so the idea of buying a bike without proper licensing is a completely odd idea to me. However, I bet I wouldn't be the only one to strongly suggest taking a MSF course to learn the basics of riding a motorcycle.

Also, get proper gear. Don't cheap out on a helmet, gloves, boots and a suit. The latter doesn't need to be a full on leather race suit (expensive!) but textile riding pants and jacket with armored knees, back and elbows on is a minimal must IMO.

Find an empty parking lot and get used to the weight of the bike, how it reacts to various inputs and do some slow speed maneuvers. Once you feel comfortable, do some emergency brakes at 30mph.

When in traffic, anticipate things ahead at least twice as far ahead as you would with a car. Move yourself out of icky situations. Not just the ones that are immediately dangerous, but also the ones that can potentially turn into a dangerous situation. I view things a bit like chess sometimes. "While riding at a certain spot things might be fine, but if that one car moves to the right, there's no way for me to make room for that merging truck, so I better speed up or slow down to make room for both first".

As in lifestyle changes... Well, stay healthy and remember, from now on forward, you'll be continually looking for excuses to ride. Your commute to work will probably take twice as long as well ;)

Hi Jerry!

I already took the MSF course a couple of months ago. I also have the license to drive the bike.

Yeah, I've been practicing my riding skills and I'm getting used to the weight of the bike lately. I'm starting to feel more comfortable in traffic now as I've been very cautious months before. I really appreciate your advice.

Regarding proper gear, I made sure I have those before I even started riding the bike in public.

Oh, one thing I'm having problem with is the wind noise. It has been bothering my ears even with my helmet on. Any suggestion on what's the best hearing protection I could buy?

Thanks!
 
Messages
9
Likes
3
Thread starter #6
Hello Mack!

+1 on what Jerry says...TAKE THE MSF COURSE!!! You'll learn a ton that can, literally, save your life! It's actually a good time as the trainers are there to TEACH YOU, not fail you!

As for "lifestyle", coming from cruisers most of my riding life, the "Lifestyle" is BS. Wear the gear that's comfortable for you and ride because you enjoy it, NOT because it's a fashion show!

Enjoy your Honda, ride safely and embrace the motorcycle therapy!
Hi Devilsfan,

Yeah, you're right. I'm not really that into looking the part of being a motorcycle rider too. It's all about being safe. When I said "lifestyle" I meant the personal changes that I need to do as I've said I'm more of a car guy before. I just started to appreciate motorcycles when my friend invited me to go in a motorcycle show/convention around 2 years ago.

I had a great with my MSF course. They also are very patient with me. LOL!

Thanks and ride safely too.
 
Messages
9
Likes
3
Thread starter #7
Welcome!!! Great advice from the guys above.

First thing, go to the MSF course. Contrary to what others think and say you do not need to know anything about motorcycles or how to ride to begin, in fact it’s better you don’t. I trained to be an MSF instructor 20 years ago and we liked fresh riders the best because they had to bad habits to break.

Second, get yourself a helmet and clothing that fits. Find a multi line helmet store and try everything on regardless of brand, price and style and figure out what fits you and feels the best. From there you can bring the price down to an acceptable level. As far as clothing, get a decent, mesh or textile jacket, one that has several zip in and out liners and layers so you’re covered for all types of weather. Don’t go super expensive, you still don’t know what you like. Same with gloves. Get a comfortable pair of over the ankle boots or motorcycle specific shoes, they’ll help you feel more stable on the bike. As time and money allows, buy a pair of motorcycle specific jeans but for now a good pair of actual denim jeans, not the cheap Old Navy stretch jeans, will suffice.

If you can find a local Cycle Gear they’ll have all of it or start looking used on Craigslist, Facebook marketplace or a local motorcycle forum.

Don’t spend a ton on stuff yet, that’s a newbie mistake. Until you’ve ridden a bit and have some time under your belt you don’t know what feels right, bad, uncomfortable or conversely what works for you and your comfort. When you start playing guitar you don’t go out and buy a Custom Shop Stratocaster, you buy a learner; same thing here. You’ll replace things as you go with what you like.

The most important thing to do is wear all your gear, all the time (ATGATT). If you get a mesh jacket it won’t be that hot even in a SC summer. And if the people you are riding with say otherwise, they are not the group to ride with because anyone that cares about you would want you safe first.

As stated, the “lifestyle” thing is BS. If that’s what you’re looking for then you’re potentially getting involved in a crowd that will spell disaster and can hurt you. Bad. Ride how you want to ride, be into it as much as you want to be in it but it doesn’t have to be anything more than that. Just know that eventually most of your extra money will go to parts, T-shirt’s, Gear, helmets, tires, etc. And that’s a good thing.

Lots of good experience on the board, we’re here to help.
Hi miweber929,

I really appreciate you sharing your knowledge. Yup, there's a lot of bad habits to break for me too.

Any suggestion on what hearing protection I should buy? I sometimes hear ringing in my ears after a long ride because of the wind noise. My brother told me that it might be an early onset of tinnitus.

Thanks!
 

Jerry

2016
CBR650F ABS
Messages
903
Likes
758
Location
The Netherlands
#8
Any suggestion on what hearing protection I should buy?
Start off with getting some simple sillicone ear plugs with noise filter. You'll have a good set for $30 or so.
You can also look at custom made ear plugs which are molded after your own ears but those are more expensive and only offer marginally better protection.
 

Devilsfan

2018
CB650F
Messages
107
Likes
66
Location
Tampa, Florida
#9
+ 1 on what Jerry says...get ear plugs!

I have a set of Sure Fire's which are pretty cool. Google "SureFire Ear Protection" and check them out. But I currently use Howard Leight Smartfit Shooter's Earplugs.
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I got them at Walmart or one of those tractor supply stores. (They come with a BLUE string). Out of all the ear plugs I've tried I like these the best. But everyone has different ear sizes so try a few of them out. Most of them are cheap.
 

miweber929

2014
CBR650F
Mod
650F Alumnus
Messages
1,629
Likes
927
Location
Woodbury, MN
#10
Hi miweber929,

I really appreciate you sharing your knowledge. Yup, there's a lot of bad habits to break for me too.

Any suggestion on what hearing protection I should buy? I sometimes hear ringing in my ears after a long ride because of the wind noise. My brother told me that it might be an early onset of tinnitus.

Thanks!
Jerry Jerry and Devilsfan Devilsfan both give good earplug advice. It doesn’t have to be fancy, expensive or specialty pieces to work under a helmet so a big box of cheapie yellow plugs from a supply store work great as well, I have one in my garage and have 3-4 pairs in each bike’s tank bag as spares.

Search the forum for an ear plug thread as well, I think someone asked about them a week or so ago and we all gave some extensive answers. Might have been another forum, though.

I personally use Vibes ear plugs available from their website or Amazon and at under $25 a set I have one in each bike. They are small, comfortable and work great whenever sound restricting is needed (I work as a radio and sound engineer so cutting down loud noises is key for me) while still keeping a full fidelity. There are others, so look around and find some that are low profile to fit under a helmet. I also got a custom set made this winter and while they fit great, on the bike it’s too much in my ear and I prefer the Vibes units still. I may give the customs another shot at some point but for now they sit on a shelf. My dad loves his, however so to each their own.

Hope this helps!!!
 
Messages
9
Likes
3
Thread starter #12
Start off with getting some simple sillicone ear plugs with noise filter. You'll have a good set for $30 or so.
You can also look at custom made ear plugs which are molded after your own ears but those are more expensive and only offer marginally better protection.
I'd like to get one of those custom pairs. Will let you know if I find one that's worth the $.
 
Messages
9
Likes
3
Thread starter #13
+ 1 on what Jerry says...get ear plugs!

I have a set of Sure Fire's which are pretty cool. Google "SureFire Ear Protection" and check them out. But I currently use Howard Leight Smartfit Shooter's Earplugs.
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I got them at Walmart or one of those tractor supply stores. (They come with a BLUE string). Out of all the ear plugs I've tried I like these the best. But everyone has different ear sizes so try a few of them out. Most of them are cheap.
I just bought a pair of generic ear plugs like this... I think there's something wrong with my ear canal. They don't fit well on me. Looking forward to buy a custom one.
 
Messages
9
Likes
3
Thread starter #14
Jerry Jerry and Devilsfan Devilsfan both give good earplug advice. It doesn’t have to be fancy, expensive or specialty pieces to work under a helmet so a big box of cheapie yellow plugs from a supply store work great as well, I have one in my garage and have 3-4 pairs in each bike’s tank bag as spares.

Search the forum for an ear plug thread as well, I think someone asked about them a week or so ago and we all gave some extensive answers. Might have been another forum, though.

I personally use Vibes ear plugs available from their website or Amazon and at under $25 a set I have one in each bike. They are small, comfortable and work great whenever sound restricting is needed (I work as a radio and sound engineer so cutting down loud noises is key for me) while still keeping a full fidelity. There are others, so look around and find some that are low profile to fit under a helmet. I also got a custom set made this winter and while they fit great, on the bike it’s too much in my ear and I prefer the Vibes units still. I may give the customs another shot at some point but for now they sit on a shelf. My dad loves his, however so to each their own.

Hope this helps!!!
Will keep Vibes in mind. I'm currently doing my research. I'll also check the thread about earplugs to make sure. Thanks!
 
Messages
9
Likes
3
Thread starter #15
I've started using auritech ear plugs (the orange ones are for bikers).

They cut out loads of wind noise, but still allow voice/music in so intercoms can work.

They come with an aluminium key chain for storage.

Recommended.

J
W
I've started using auritech ear plugs (the orange ones are for bikers).

They cut out loads of wind noise, but still allow voice/music in so intercoms can work.

They come with an aluminium key chain for storage.

Recommended.

J
I'll check this brand out to. It sounds like it's of good quality. But I'm leaning towards buying a custom one since my ears still hurt from wearing a generic ear plugs last night.
 

Devilsfan

2018
CB650F
Messages
107
Likes
66
Location
Tampa, Florida
#16
MacKenzie - I also bought two pairs of the SureFire's.




The first set, if you look at the picture, the black part that goes inside the ear fit (Med) but the medium silicone tips they made were too small for my ear canal. So I decided to get a size LARGE with the FOAM tips...well, the foam tips work 100% better, but the (Large) black part that goes around the inside of the ear was too big.
What I wound up doing was pull the foam part off and put them on the (Med) black part. These are really nice but, IMO, don't muffle the sound as much as those orange plugs I wear do.

With the Surefire's you have the option to push in the little noise-cancelling tips. This will muffle ALL sounds, whereas having those tips out will muffle outside sounds but will allow you to hear voices much better.


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haqzore

2014
CBR650F
Admin
Mod
Messages
1,378
Likes
845
Location
United States / Northern KY
#17
Welcome M MackenzieHailey

I can't really do much better than what's already been done. Such great people & knowledge here.

Only thing I might add is that I know a lot of riders who will use cheap foam earplugs. The kind you smush down before you insert them into the ear. Grab a bag for a few $s and keep them in your riding jacket/etc just in case.

There've been times I forgot mine and used the pocket stash. And times I was able to hand them out on group rides as well to others. Anything is better than nothing.
 
Messages
9
Likes
3
Thread starter #18
MacKenzie - I also bought two pairs of the SureFire's.




The first set, if you look at the picture, the black part that goes inside the ear fit (Med) but the medium silicone tips they made were too small for my ear canal. So I decided to get a size LARGE with the FOAM tips...well, the foam tips work 100% better, but the (Large) black part that goes around the inside of the ear was too big.
What I wound up doing was pull the foam part off and put them on the (Med) black part. These are really nice but, IMO, don't muffle the sound as much as those orange plugs I wear do.

With the Surefire's you have the option to push in the little noise-cancelling tips. This will muffle ALL sounds, whereas having those tips out will muffle outside sounds but will allow you to hear voices much better.


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Hey,

I already found a business near my place that specializes in customized ear plugs/hearing protection. Thank God!

Had to stop at a diner earlier for some snack and fortunately I met a fellow rider who owns a company called Big Ear Inc. The guy's name is Glenn and we had a pretty long conversation about motorcycles, customization and other stuff. I somehow told him that I sometimes hear ringing in my ears whenever I had to ride for long hours and then he laughed and told me about his story of having that same thing called tinnitus. He told me that he owns a business that specializes in hearing protection and invited me to come by and have my ears fitted. Gave me his number and told me to check their website. First impression is that he's a great guy!

They have some good stuff and I hope that the product I ordered is worth the $.

Here's a link to the motorcycle products they have
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Excited to get my customized filter ear plugs. Really lucky to have met the guy. I think I'm going to have a ride buddy now. LOL!
 

Devilsfan

2018
CB650F
Messages
107
Likes
66
Location
Tampa, Florida
#19
They have some good stuff and I hope that the product I ordered is worth the $.

Here's a link to the motorcycle products they have
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Excited to get my customized filter ear plugs. Really lucky to have met the guy. I think I'm going to have a ride buddy now. LOL!

Holy chit!!! $108 for the motorcycle ear plugs?!?!
I pay $4 for two sets of the Howard Leight's.

Make sure you give us a good review of the ones you purchase. I'd like to know if they're worth it or not.